On My Mind…Higher Ed. Online Learning

As more and more K-12 institutions consider adding online learning courses to their learning pathways, it becomes more important to read about the reasons for heading this route i.e., what are the lessons learned, how institutions should prepare for the shift, what constitutes learner readiness, what courses yield better results, what training should be provided to teachers, etc. With the online learning movement spreading to the K-12 industry, now is the time to study the good, bad and ugly. Higher Ed. institutions had to cross the teaching/learning chasm a few years ago in order to retain students, meet diverse student learning styles & other needs, secure highly qualified instructors, and keep costs contained to name a few. Listed below are some initial readings to begin to gain a better understanding of the underpinnings and frameworks needed to support online learning:

  • Abrami, P. C., Bernard, R. M., Bures, E. M., Borokhovski, E., Tamim, R. M. (2011). Interaction in distance education and online learning: Using evidence and theory to improve practice. Journal of Computer in Higher Education, 23(2), 82-103.
  • Dikkers, A. G. (2015). The intersection of online and face-to-face teaching: Implications for virtual school teacher practice and professional development. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 47(3), 139-156.
  • King, S. E., Arnold, K. C. (2012). Blended learning environments in higher education: A case study of how professors make it happen. Mid-Western Educational Research, 25(1/2), 44-59.
  • McDonald, P. L., Straker, H. O., Schlumpf, K. S., Plack, M. M. (2014). Learning partnership: Students and faculty learning together to facilitate reflection and higher order thinking in a blended course. Online Learning Journal, 18(4), 1-22.
  • Picciano, A. G., Seaman, J., Shea P., Swan, K. (2012). Examining the extent and nature of online learning in american K-12 education: The research initiatives of the Alfred P. Sloan foundation. Internet and Higher Education, 15, 127-135.
  • Reece, S. A. (2015). Online learning environments in higher education: Connectivism vs. dissociation. Education and Information Technologies, 20(3), 579-588.
  • Richardson, J. C., Swan, K. (2003). Examining social presence in online courses in relation to students’ perceived learning and satisfaction. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 7(1), 68-88.
  • Smith, S. J., Basham, J., Rice, M. F., Carter Jr., R. A. (2016). Preparing special educators for K-12 online learning environments: A survey of teacher educators. Journal of Special Education Technology, 31(3), 170-178.
  • Vaughan, N. (2007). Perspectives on blended learning in higher education. International Journal on E-Learning, 6(1), 81-94.

On My Mind…TPACK Model

This week’s EDU800 readings revolved around the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge developed by Punya Mishra and Matthew J. Koehler (2005). Their framework most famously known as TPACK was built to understand and describe the kinds of knowledge that teachers need to employ for effective pedagogical practice in a technology enhanced or mediated learning environment. The TPACK framework examines the relationships between pedagogy, content and technology. The articles listed below provide a point of view about the TPACK contextual factors through the lens of specific grade levels, departments or programs:

  • Blackwell, C., Lauricella, A., Wartella, E. (2016). The influence of TPACK contextual factors on early childhood educators’ tablet computer use. Computers & Education, 98, 57-69.
  • Jang, S., Tasi, M. (2013). Exploring the TPACK of Taiwanese secondary school science teachers using a new contextualized TPACK model. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 29(4), 566-580.
  • Olofson, M., Swallow, M., Neumann, M. (2016). TPACKing: A constructivist framing of TPACK to analyze teachers’ construction of knowledge. Computers & Education, 95, 188-201.
  • Smith, S. (2013/2014). Through the teacher’s eyes: Unpacking the TPACK of digital fabrication integration in middle school language arts. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 46(2), 207-227.
  • Wetzel, K., Marshall, S. (2011-12). TPACK goes to sixth grade: Lessons from a middle school teacher in a high-technology-access classroom. International Society for Technology in Education, 28(2), 73-81.

 

 

On My Mind…Reading on the Internet

I recently read a few interesting articles in my EDU800 Research Foundations course on reading hypertext. My studies prompted me to do a little more research due to my curiosities with web reading and researching for classroom learning. I feel assumptions are sometimes made when assigning students web reading work. As a profession, I feel we assume students (oftentimes middle schoolers) have the necessary skills to read web materials to acquire knowledge which they will then apply to classroom activities or projects. Web reading is a very complex process and many learner variables need to be considered so that classrooms can capitalize on reading through connectivity. Listed below are some additional articles or research articles I read to grow my understanding of the why, how and what of web reading for lower elementary students as well as middle school students.

  • Coiro, J., Dobler, E. (2007). Exploring the Online Reading Comprehension Strategies Used by Sixth-Grade Skilled Readers to Search for and Locate Information on the Internet, 42(2), 214-257.
  • Sayler, D. (2015). Reading the Web: Internet Guided Reading with Young Children. Reading Teacher, 69(1), 35-39.
  • Wang, T. (2011). Developing Web-based Assessment Strategies for Facilitating Junior High School Students to Perform Self-regulating in an E-Learning Environment. Computers & Education, 57(2), 1801-812.

On My Mind…Learning Spaces

It’s been quite a busy and crazy start to the 16-17 school year! Just finishing rolling out 50 updated K-12 classrooms based off of the district’s Next-Gen Classroom framework! Teachers worked all summer to concept their new classrooms, set instructional goals, develop new instructional strategies/approaches, find and repurpose furniture, select new furnishings, select desired technology to facilitate learning and got their classrooms ready for the start of school. You talk about thinking outside the box, getting outside of comfort zones, being creators, taking risk and having flexibility….it’s AWESOME! Taking a moment to breathe now, allows me a little time to find research articles on learning spaces. Here are a few research-based articles I’ve come across on this topic:

  • Baglier, T., Caswell, T. (2016). Destroy Your Classroom! Re-conceptualizing the Instructor/Student Model in Academic Libraries, Journal of Library Administration, 56(1), 17-26
  • Campbell, M., Saltmarsh, S., Chapman, A., Drew, C. (2013). Issues of Teacher Professional Learning within “non-traditional” Classroom Environments. Improving Schools, 16(3), 209-22
  • Hunter, T., James, B. (2015). An Examination of the Views of Key Stakeholders on the Development of Learning Spaces at a Regional University. Journal of Facilities Management, 13(2), 204-222