Purposeful Play with Puzzlets!

I’ve been blogging lately about a variety of newer educational technology tools that promote gamification and game-based learning for the K-5 classrooms to support coding, math, inquiry, storytelling, purposeful play, communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity. I would like to share another gamification tool called Puzzlets. Puzzlets Play Tray is a hardware accessory for a tablet or computer on an iOS or Android platform that allows students to build programs out of real Puzzlet pieces to navigate through an app-based gaming storyline. Puzzlets game pieces are grounded in computer science methodology with each game app focusing on a STEAM subject area. Although the vendor suggests that Puzzlets can be utilized for a K-8 student population, my guess with student prowess continuing to develop in the computer science arena, that the more appropriate grade range is K-5.

There is very little upfront set-up needed to get this technology tool up and running quickly in the classroom. Simply add an app, Cork the Volcano as an example, onto a mobile device and either hardwire the Puzzlets Play Tray or use the Bluetooth wireless connection. I would recommend that students work in pairs, with one student acting as the “navigator” by putting the instruction tiles together on the Play Tray while the other student is the “driver” of the app that advances the program throughout the gaming quest. Students level up by first participating in a “build mode” to plan and determine the possible solution to the challenge on the screen, then run the “play mode” button on the app to gauge their coding success as well as use trial and error to fix any programming problems so that they can guide their character successfully through the quest with the end goal of rescuing their island to “cork the volcano” with the treasures they’ve earned along their journey. Each level up requires a higher level of critical thinking, many more attempts through trial and error, and efficient coding because the quests become timed. As students develop their newfound programming skills, they can go back and replay previous levels to collect more treasures and also practice their enhanced coding skills. What is interesting about this gaming app is that directions and wording does not fill the screen or drive their learning, it is more about intuition, deep thinking and possible solutions. The Puzzlets gaming system currently offers three apps including Cork the Volcano which focuses on coding, Abacus Finch which focuses on math skills and Swatch Out which introduces color theory.

In eLearning educational gaming terms, Puzzlets Play Tray would be considered more of a gamification tool because:

  • it utilizes game design elements and mechanics to challenge and motivate the students
  • it takes an existing course of coding or math and adds gaming elements such as point systems, level progressions and achievement badges
  • the game is created to engage learners so that they become active participants in their own learning
  • the game elements are integrated to help the learner achieve their learning goals and objectives

Additionally, the Puzzlets gaming system pairs nicely with the current ISTE Standards for Students as they become:

  • Empowered learners to take an active role in choosing, achieving and demonstrating coding competency by mastery/leveling up
  • Knowledge constructors by using trial and error to solve the challenges screen by screen
  • Innovative designers by creating imaginative solutions to complete each path and level up in a timely fashion
  • Computational thinkers by testing solutions and leveraging their power as a collaborative team
  • Creative communicators in how the student teams use the platform pieces and app to reach their goals

Furthermore, through grit, failure and teamwork, students have the power to persevere and develop core academic and foundational technology skills. I think the vendor tagline says it all, “make game time, brain time”!

OSMO is in the House!

osmo_3The district in which I work, lately has been the lucky recipient of a variety of new technology tools to integrate into the classroom setting. One of the tools taking a few elementary and special education classrooms by storm is OSMO. OSMO is a gaming accessory that is compatible with the full line of Apple iPads that have cameras in conjunction with specific free apps that get downloaded to support the hands-on play. OSMO promotes gaming for students aged 4-12 in the areas of creative problem-solving, art, STEM, and the Common Core curriculum standards. Additionally, OSMO supports a variety of languages too.

There is a little upfront set-up needed before OSMO can be actively used in a classroom setting. An adult must go to www.playosmo.com/start on the iPad designated as the classroom OSMO gaming system to begin the set-up process. Critical to the set-up process is writing down the activation code to link the account with the downloaded games. From there, the gaming base needs to get attached to the iPad as well as the red reflector that sits on top of the iPad camera. The last step in the process, is to select a Classroom (or teacher) avatar and create student profiles if there is a desire to track student progress down the road.

The OSMO gaming system offers a variety of games including Tangram, Words, Newton, Masterpiece, Numbers, Coding, Monster, and Pizza Co. Access to these games depends on what kits or games were purchased. Each OSMO game has a set of specific educational skills on which students can work in small collaborative groups (pairs preferred) or independently if tracking student usage and levels achieved is desired. With the Pizza Co. game, OSMO teaches students about real-world math, money, fractions and non-verbal communication skills. Whereas, the OSMO Numbers game focuses on teaching counting, addition and multiplication as outlined by the Common Core standards. Given my district’s push to include coding in the K-3 classrooms, I can see the OSMO Coding game challenging students to work in collaborative pairs to construct code and conquer a tree-shaking, strawberry-munching adventure.

In eLearning educational gaming terms, OSMO would be considered more of a game-based learning tool because it is tied directly to curriculum and teaches specific skills, as well as providing students with the opportunity to practice and acquire new skills in a fun and engaging way. Furthermore, using the SAMR model to evaluate OSMO’s impact in the teaching and learning process, this gaming system would hover on the lower half of the SAMR model between the Substitution and Augmentation levels depending on how the lesson or groups of lessons are constructed around this technology tool. The OSMO gaming system would make a great addition to any K-5 classroom and can be implemented as an independent workstation because it is very intuitive to the end-users, and won’t require too much troubleshooting. In fact, OSMO might become your virtual teaching assistant! To see OSMO in action, take a look at a couple of videos teachers in my district have created.